27. april 2018

Monika Platek

Platek-Foto-Krzysztof-Żuczkowski

Photo: Krzysztof Żuczkowski

Monika Platek, Head of the Criminology Department, Professor of Law at the Law Faculty of Warsaw University. Co-founder of Polish Association For Legal Education, Fulbright and French Academy of Science scholar. One of the “horses” from Norwegian criminologist Nils Christie “stable”.

She received Polish-Swedish Equality Glasses Award (2013), The European LGBTQA+ Tolerantia Award (2014), Cristal Chandelier Award for building religion neutral state (2015) and Jewish Combatant Award for acting against anti-Semitism, racism and xenophobia (2018).

She teaches criminology, comparative criminology, comparative criminal justice, correction, and comparative criminal law and gender jurisprudence at Gender Studies.

Key note title

What is specific about Eastern European gender-based violence (GBV)? 

We share within the United Nations, the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW). Within the Council of Europe, we share the Convention on Preventing and Combating Violence against Women and Domestic Violence (Istanbul Convention), as well as the recently adopted Recommendation on preventing and combating sexism (CM/Rec(2019)1).

Despite such a common ground, I claim that a specific regional approach makes sense. It helps to distinguish between different legal and practical patterns of dealing with gender-based violence. It also provides an insight into the historical and political gender-based reasons behind particular legal standards. Moreover, it clarifies the differences that have produced and re-produced gendered social roles and norms across Europe and beyond. The German, Swedish, Byelorussian, and Polish legislation on domestic violence and sexual abuse (rape) will serve as examples. The situation of sexual minorities will be included.

I will also pay attention to effective tools and measures of GBV prevention, illustrated by examples of specific practices by Polish women and men, and the growth in women’s activism in Poland.